The best way to learn about a new place is tasting its food: through the flavors we can know more about the traditions and history of the people who live in these places.
Experimenting with new ingredients makes life interesting and if the foods are especially nutrient-dense — even better. They are so high in vitamins, minerals, and other healing compounds that health experts call them superfoods. In their countries of origin, these berries, nuts, plants, and seeds have been used for thousands of years to holistically medicate the body or just add yumminess to everyday, wholesome meals.

Faux Roe “Boats”

Faux roe boats

Roe, roe, roe your boat...

These "Faux Roe Boats", or gunkan maki, are a fun sushi to make, and easier than normal rolled sushi - perfect for beginners!

Recipe from Vegetarian Sushi Secrets by Marisa Baggett, out today!

Ingredients
Cooking Directions
  1. Wet your fingertips and palms lightly with water. Grab a walnut-sized amount of the sushi rice (about 2 tablespoons) and mold it into a rectangular mound. The bottom should be flat. Repeat this with the remaining rice to form 12 "beds" in all.
  2. Cut the nori into twelve 1 1/2 x 5-in (4x13-cm) strips. (Any remaining nori can be saved and cut into "seatbelts" for nigiri sushi.) Wrap one strip of nori, rough side facing in, around 1 bed of rice to form a wall. If desired, use a single grain of rice to "glue" the edges together. Repeat with remaining nori strips and rice beds.
  3. Arrange the rice beds on a serving tray. Top each with 1 tablespoon of the faux roe.

 

 

Roe, roe, roe your boat...

These "Faux Roe Boats", or gunkan maki, are a fun sushi to make, and easier than normal rolled sushi - perfect for beginners!

Recipe from Vegetarian Sushi Secrets by Marisa Baggett, out today!

Ingredients
Cooking Directions
  1. Wet your fingertips and palms lightly with water. Grab a walnut-sized amount of the sushi rice (about 2 tablespoons) and mold it into a rectangular mound. The bottom should be flat. Repeat this with the remaining rice to form 12 "beds" in all.
  2. Cut the nori into twelve 1 1/2 x 5-in (4x13-cm) strips. (Any remaining nori can be saved and cut into "seatbelts" for nigiri sushi.) Wrap one strip of nori, rough side facing in, around 1 bed of rice to form a wall. If desired, use a single grain of rice to "glue" the edges together. Repeat with remaining nori strips and rice beds.
  3. Arrange the rice beds on a serving tray. Top each with 1 tablespoon of the faux roe.

I received a copy of this cookbook for free, as well as provided a foreword for the cookbook. Links in this post may be affiliate links.



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